DOG ON A LOG Books are written with my daughter as the first audience. The characters have strong families and close friends. The children and adults all treat each other with kindness and respect. The DOG ON A LOG world is full of imagination where things like a sub in the fish tank or a ship that flies to the sun really do happen, at least in the minds of the children. There’s not a lot of scary or overly sad stuff because it’s already hard enough for some kids to read without being afraid of what might happen. A couple books, such as Tolt the Kind Cat do have a few sad moments (like when the fox pups are missing their parents who are recovering at a wildlife center,) but there’s always a happy ending.

DOG ON A LOG Books start out simple because of restrictions from severely limited phonics. But even by Step 2, you can read Mud on the Path from the child’s point of view, then read the story again in The Cub from the cub’s point of view.

As the Steps progress, the phonics, the grammar, the stories, and the kids mature. More of the kids living in the area are introduced, then their lives start intersecting. In Step 9 a five-book mystery begins. It will span five steps of increasing phonics. Best of all, the mystery series is NOT about a crime, unlike so many mysteries.

DOG ON A LOG Books have passed the standards set by both Secular and Religious groups. They are stories any family can enjoy together. And with Tup the dog and flocks of chickens to join in adventures, you never know where the real-life families and friends or the imaginations of the child-characters may take the readers.